Children must grow up with discipline because it is a way of life that they must learn to acquire, as soon as they realize that their cries, their temper and their tantrums have a powerful effect on those around them. Disciplining a child though does not necessarily equate to inflicting punishment or sanctions. It is a matter of devising ways and means for letting a child distinguish right from wrong, whilst founded on examples set by parents and siblings who pose as role models.

Discipline is something that must be observed within and outside of the home. Schools are sticklers for discipline because it is impossible to deal with hundreds of children if every child is allowed to do as he pleases. Employers impose discipline because any wrongdoing that may be committed by an employee is a reflection on the part of the business or company. Use of public roads and places also require discipline in order to maintain order and more importantly, to avoid chaos and accidents.

Now if discipline was not implemented as part of a child’s rearing, it is likely that the growing up child and future adult will have difficulty interacting with people in general. In the same way, if a child grows up with a distorted sense of what is right or wrong, for which he or she was disciplined to follow, the result will be just as bad.

What does Discipline Entail

The principle of discipline therefore requires more than just stopping a child from doing as he pleases regardless of consequences. It must be applied based on a child’s level of mental and emotional comprehension. The effort and time exerted to instill discipline is by way of the most exhaustive methods possible and/or necessary. If a child received well-thought out discipline, parents will eventually have less need to impose it, because self-discipline would have been instilled in the child.

Discipline is Not a One-Method-Applies-to-All Type of Action

One of the reasons why some parents are reluctant toward taking disciplinary actions is the potential conflict or animosity that may arise between parent and child. Parents though must remember that they were once a child too. They must draw from their own experience why they did not like being disciplined and what part of discipline did they fail to understand.

Was it the yelling, the nagging, the instantaneous judgments or the automatic rejection of explanations that caused them to dislike being disciplined? If these had negative effects, then why insist on using them as methods of disciplining a child? Now if doing the opposite still does not produce the right behavior, then consider the possibility of the problem as being deep-seated.

Perhaps the child is simply calling out for attention; or may be experiencing a difficulty that they do not how to explain. At worst, a hearing disorder has not been detected. As in any establishment outside the home, proper investigation must be conducted and evaluated before a disciplinary action is taken.